BIML and MIST – a first encounter

The MIST developers – Varigence – have been waving their product at me for a wee while now and I’ve finally had a chance to get into the IDE and get a better feel for it.

Before I get too carried away, here’s a quick 101. There’s this thing called BIML – an XML dialect for describing BI Assets (for now, only in the Microsoft world). This opens the door to scripting and therefore simpler dynamic generation of BI objects. BIML can be used by BIDS Helper (a thing you should have if you are an active BI developer) or the more focused BIML IDE MIST.

Now, I’ve seen the shiny video that promised the world, but nothing quite beats hands on experience. So I’ve started following the online user guide and got as far as building a Dimension table.

My feelings so far? I’m a bit “meh”. Now I know there’s a lot more capability to the product which I haven’t got to yet – so this is far from final commentary – but there are a few clear things that I think need to be looked at in the product to give it the sense of really being a development accelerator.

First up, it’s pretty clunky. It suffers heavily from “kitchen sinkism” – i.e. because it can do something, there’s a dialog box / screen / tab for it displayed all at once. Take for example this table development screen:

MIST Table Development
MIST Table Development

 

There’s a lot going on and that’s on a 1920×1080 screen….   some better screen space organisation is needed.

Next up is the fact that the designers don’t add a lot over the basic SSMS  capability. The table designer there is effectively the same blank grid that you get in the SSMS table designer, but without even the courtesy of being able to add another row without going back to the ribbon. At this point I’d be more inclined to develop in SSMS and import to MIST.

Then my next concern is over value add / accessibility.  For example, when setting up a project there’s some basic stuff that needs to be done – setting up connections, importing from databases – that should just be a wizard when starting up  a fresh project.  When creating a dimension, a bundle of default attributes should be added (preferably from a checklist or custom template).

So my first impression is that it needs a user experience workover. However this is a far from unique criticism of many developer tools so I won’t go too  hard on them. I’ll press on with it and see how the functionality unveils itself.

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Is ETL Development doomed?

A slightly dramatic title, but over the last few months I’ve been exposed to a number of tools that will provide a strong layer of automation to ETL development, eliminating a lot of the basic need for ETL developers to shift data from System A to Database B and beyond.

I’ve been hands on with a couple:

And also heard about a couple more:

… and I’m certain this list is not comprehensive. The significant takeaway is that software build automation in the BI world is starting to catch up with where other software languages have already been (Coded a website lately? many IDE’s do most of the hard work for you now). Much as IDE driven tools such as DTS, SSIS and so on moved us away from hand coding SQL and wrapping up those scripts, the latest round of tools are moving us away from the IDE’s where we drag and drop our flows.

How will ETL careers be killed?

There seems to be a couple of tracks for this. First is the pure development automation tools, such as Varigence MIST. If you are technically minded, take a look at this product demo video – though I suggest skipping to about 25 minutes in to see the real meat as it does go on a bit. It looks mindbogglingly powerful but is clearly shooting at the ETL pro who wants to churn stuff out faster, more consistently and with less fiddling about. MIST is limited to SSIS/AS (for now) and I’m not sure how far it will go as it’s clearly aimed at the developer pro market, which is not always the big buyers. I expect to be playing with it more over the next few weeks on a live project so should be able to get a better view.

The second path appears to be more targeted at eliminating ETL developers in their entirety. AnalytixDS wraps up metadata import (i.e. you suck in your source and target metadata from the systems or ERWIN), do the mapping of fields and apply rules, then “push button make code”. Obviously there’s a bit more to it than that, but the less you care about your back end and the quality of your ETL code (cough Wherescape cough) the more likely this product will appeal to you. Say hello, business users, who are the big buyers (though I look forward to troubleshooting your non-scalable disasters in the near future).

What’s the diagnosis, doctor?

Long term, the demand for ETL skills will decline on the back of these tools. Simple ETL work will simply go away, but the hard stuff will remain and it will become an even more niche skill that will pay handsomely – though you may spend more time configuring and troubleshooting products than working with raw code. Which class of tool dominates is uncertain, but I’m leaning towards the business oriented mapping tools that completely abstract away from ETL development altogether.

If you’ve had any experience with these tools, I’d love to hear about them in the comments.

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What will we do when White Collar Automation takes our jobs?

While I’m in a bit of a groove about the future of the workplace, I may as well talk about how there may not be a future for the workplace.

Automation destroyed the working class

The Industrial Revolution was so long ago now that it qualifies as history. The replacement of skilled labour with machines wiped out a whole class of skilled workers, but simultaneously expanded opportunities for unskilled workers to such an extent that overall standards of living rose and most people saw this as a Good Thing(tm). However since the seventies, robotics and computing started to strip humans from the factory to the point that now the modern factory floor workforce is only a tiny proportion of what it used to be. Similar effects can be found in farming, where vast farms are now run by just a handful of people.

Any repetitive physical task can be completed by a robot – and nobody has questioned this too hard. Factory conditions are harsh and most people don’t want to perform the exact same task hundreds of times a day due to the physical and psychic toll that can take.

However a clear upshot of this is that unskilled labour has little place in a modern economy. You could perhaps be a driver (a career with probably less that 20 years left before that becomes automated) – work in retail (currently being seriously eroded by ecommerce) – construction (safe for now) – but the options are limited and shrinking. If a job doesn’t require physical presence (e.g. Bricklayer) or face-to-face interaction (most sales) then it is potentially at risk.

A debate I’ve been having recently with a friend thinks that office workers are more immune…  but I think she’s being rather optimistic.

Analytics will destroy the middle class

Famed economist John Maynard Keynes once predicted widespread unemployment “due to our discovery of means of economising the use of labour outrunning the pace at which we can find new uses for labour” – i.e. we will make the economy so efficient that we don’t need all available working people to run it any more.

Now this future has been long foreseen by Science Fiction writers and falls across a wide spectrum of possibilities. There’s the wildly optimistic future presented by the late Iain M. Banks of “The Culture” where effectively machines take care of humanity in a benign manner and give them a life of luxury and freedom. Then there is the darker end, such as UK comic 2000AD‘s character Judge Dredd‘s dystopian Mega Cities where wealth is concentrated in the hands of the few and 99% of the population is unemployed and lives off far from generous state handouts and life for most people is pretty dismal.

According to a study by Oxford University nearly 47% of US jobs are at high risk of being replaced by automation within the next 20 years. So this may be a reality we need to work out sooner rather than later. If your job involves decision making and it has routine repeatable elements to it then it is at risk of a pattern detecting engine being applied to it and that decision making process delegated to a machine. This could be as simple as approving a loan – something that is largely automated anyway – or as complex as diagnosing cancer.

Now many people may resist this and argue that a machine could never replicate the subtlety of human thinking. To some extent that is true, but the quality of human decision making is poor and it is arguable that handing over things such as medical diagnoses to systems that can absorb a volume of data far beyond our poor human brains capacity – and assess it rationally and fairly – may well improve the decisions that do get made.

So, perhaps it is time hail our new AI overlords, and let us pray they are kind to their creators…

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